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Old 01-19-2020, 09:45 AM   #1
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Melvin & Money

Our in house minimalist has to be cheapest person I have ever encountered. Lets put his favorite fantasy to the test, he was going to float down the Mississippi on a rubber raft and sell his "skills" to a warlord in Louisiana. For one thing rafts are slow compared to a kayak.

To fund his minimalist plans he would have needed a kayak, paddle, camouflaged life preserver, a couple of dry bags containing everything he needed, a durable sleeping bag, approximately 10 days worth of food, like Mountain house or else some other freeze dried to save weight. A light rifle or carbine w/ 200 rds of ammo, a pistol in shoulder holster w/ 100 rds of ammo. No more weight than 150-200 pounds depending on the size of kayak he bought. All the this purchased with quality in mind couldn't cost more than $2,500.00-$3,000.00 not much money, add another $1,000.00 for a double kayak and kit if he plans on bringing wifey.. So why is Melvin always go on the cheap.
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Old 01-19-2020, 09:50 AM   #2
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He would not like those gourmet foods, tang, peanut butter an molasses suits him better. Durable sleeping bag! Never happen.

The warlords would think a comedy show had arrived!

Last edited by BigBassMan; 01-19-2020 at 09:58 AM.
 
Old 01-19-2020, 02:40 PM   #3
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Save money on the Kayak and the rifle. Nail 2X4's to 4 empty 55 gallon oil drums. Instant raft. Don't worry about leaking, the holes are on top. Get a used .22 Papoose single shot .22. Get an empty beer can and some steel wool for a suppressor. For ammunition go to a big box sports store and when no one is looking dump a couple boxes of .22 in your pocket and get rid of the boxes so the bar code doesn't set off the alarm on the way out.. Most cities have some kind of free food give away program, hang around there until you have sufficient cheese and peanut butter for a couple of months. Now just sit down by the river and take some Ambien until SHTF.
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Old 01-19-2020, 04:14 PM   #4
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Just watch Craigslist. People dump kayaks all the time. Once they discover it takes work to make them go, they tend to stop using them.
 
Old 01-20-2020, 06:47 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garand View Post
Our in house minimalist has to be cheapest person I have ever encountered. Lets put his favorite fantasy to the test, he was going to float down the Mississippi on a rubber raft and sell his "skills" to a warlord in Louisiana. For one thing rafts are slow compared to a kayak.

To fund his minimalist plans he would have needed a kayak, paddle, camouflaged life preserver, a couple of dry bags containing everything he needed, a durable sleeping bag, approximately 10 days worth of food, like Mountain house or else some other freeze dried to save weight. A light rifle or carbine w/ 200 rds of ammo, a pistol in shoulder holster w/ 100 rds of ammo. No more weight than 150-200 pounds depending on the size of kayak he bought. All the this purchased with quality in mind couldn't cost more than $2,500.00-$3,000.00 not much money, add another $1,000.00 for a double kayak and kit if he plans on bringing wifey.. So why is Melvin always go on the cheap.


If he buys used, two Kayaks would set him back less than $600.00
depending on what he chooses, and how many meals a day he plans on eating, the food for 10 days would be $200.00 or less. He should get a water filter, so add $150.00 for a good one (deliberately priced high). A couple of dry bags would probably set him back $100, getting some big enough for his sleeping bag. Sleeping bag - call it $300.00 (he could get by much cheaper)

so we are looking at roughly $1,350 - this assumes he already has the fire arms and clothing he would need. might have to add a small stove for another $50.00, but he could use the coffee can hobo stove for free.

I think most people would think their life is worth far more than that.

call it $2,000.00 for a decent set up for two people.
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Last edited by Dorobuta; 01-20-2020 at 08:54 AM.
 
Old 01-20-2020, 09:28 AM   #6
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I was thinking of some of the better quality kayak's at about $750 each, and gear for 2, but then that's me trying to find the best bang for the buck, due to the length Mississippi. But you are correct at a minimum $2,000.00, it is to bad that he doesn't think that either his nor wifeys lives are worth that much.
 
Old 01-20-2020, 09:50 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Dorobuta View Post
Just watch Craigslist. People dump kayaks all the time. Once they discover it takes work to make them go, they tend to stop using them.
While it takes work to paddle, it would also if Melvin went with his original idea of a rubber raft. A kayak is easier to paddle, allowing Melvin to make greater distances each day, the plastics of today are far more durable than the surfaces of a rubber life raft and if portages are required enroute the kayak is easier to manipulate and maneuver often weighing less. It would be interesting to see what is available a second hand one vice a new one.
 
Old 01-20-2020, 10:18 AM   #8
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I was thinking of some of the better quality kayak's at about $750 each, and gear for 2, but then that's me trying to find the best bang for the buck, due to the length Mississippi. But you are correct at a minimum $2,000.00, it is to bad that he doesn't think that either his nor wifeys lives are worth that much.
There's a lot of the so called sport kayaks and fishing kayaks that show up all the time. The Mississippi isn't rough enough to require one with a sealed skirt, etc. a sit on or a sit in model would work. most come with a dry compartment and plenty of places to lash gear to.
 
Old 01-20-2020, 10:38 AM   #9
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Actually thinking about it, some of the videos that I have watched over time also recommend a wet suit for when the water temperature gets below +50F. That is best bought new.
 
Old 01-20-2020, 10:43 AM   #10
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You have to paddle a kayak. Mel likes a raft so he can take his sedatives an sleep floating down the river an get run over by a barge.
 
Old 01-20-2020, 11:46 AM   #11
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Actually thinking about it, some of the videos that I have watched over time also recommend a wet suit for when the water temperature gets below +50F. That is best bought new.
Somewhere I have the tables for hyperthermia. 50F water can definitely zap you good after a while.

Floating down the Mississippi is not my plan, but I would approach it a lot differently, if it were.
 
Old 01-20-2020, 12:01 PM   #12
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While Melvin's personal plan leaves a lot to be desired, we must keep in mind that there are still many waterways in North America that can be utilized, if your purpose is strictly to go from point A to point B without moving a lot of kit. Depending on the circumstances it might be viable. Another thought, along with the Dry bags, personally I think I would invest in one of those "Food Saver" machines, it would keep all items additionally safe from water and with the vacuum seal it would reduce bulk.
 
Old 01-20-2020, 01:16 PM   #13
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While Melvin's personal plan leaves a lot to be desired, we must keep in mind that there are still many waterways in North America that can be utilized, if your purpose is strictly to go from point A to point B without moving a lot of kit. Depending on the circumstances it might be viable. Another thought, along with the Dry bags, personally I think I would invest in one of those "Food Saver" machines, it would keep all items additionally safe from water and with the vacuum seal it would reduce bulk.
I know someone who uses one for his gear and clothing on long hunts. keeps spare socks and underwear sealed in a bag like that.

I used to make fun of him...until I learned the hard way that it isn't that bad of an idea. I need to pick one up...
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Old 01-21-2020, 06:38 AM   #14
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I watched an hour show on You Tube last evening of 2 young men in their 30's, doing a sea kayak trip in Norway. They started at the southern most point and paddled 1,060 km north to the Arctic Circle. Their choice in Kayak was a sea version which is a little longer, more expensive, but able to support about 325 lbs of person and gear. For the long distance trips it is probably better/safer to go with one of those than the cheaper version built for fishing.
 
Old 01-21-2020, 07:19 AM   #15
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I applaud experimentation, but it has to be done carefully & thoughtfully. Cheap for cheap's sake is usually a mistake.

One of my favorite lines is "sometimes the cheap stuff is just too expensive". Buying the cheapest batteries, cheapest tires, cheapest ammunition, cheapest shoes, cheapest whatever, often means we actually spend more in the long run, due both to replacement costs and unexpected costs due to using the cheapest stuff available. Damaged electronics from leaking batteries, gun damage from cheap ammo (especially purchased reloads), etc. I love getting a crazy cheap deal on good stuff, but I abhor (and try to avoid) inherently cheap stuff.
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Old 01-21-2020, 06:52 PM   #16
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Next question, I'm assuming that anyone using a kayak, to move from point A to point B is going to be lightly armed. At least 1 rifle fitted in a dry bag made for rifles secured on top of the boat by bungee cords and probably a handgun. One could assume that the handgun will be worn in some sort of shoulder holster under your life preserver for easy access. Does anyone have any ideas regarding a holster that would work for the situation?
 
Old 01-22-2020, 09:36 AM   #17
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So I did a quick shopping list:

Mantis UL - hammock, tarp, and bugnet. $279.00 weight less than 2lbs.
add a set of tree straps, 29.00. weight 3 oz.
Firequilt rated to 32F, 295.00, 25oz.

3lbs for the entire set up, all durable and quality gear. roughly $650.00

Not cheap, but a bargain if you are building a bug-out set up and your life will depend on your gear.

entire setup packs down to about the size of a football and a half. Again, it weight 3lbs for everything.

I may get the firequilt, and replace or supplement my bag with it.

so you can replace the cobbled together gear with quality gear that is stronger and lighter.

I didn't bother to shop for best prices, these are the list prices. (Kammock is the brand)

Last edited by Dorobuta; 01-22-2020 at 09:40 AM.
 
Old 01-22-2020, 09:39 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garand View Post
Next question, I'm assuming that anyone using a kayak, to move from point A to point B is going to be lightly armed. At least 1 rifle fitted in a dry bag made for rifles secured on top of the boat by bungee cords and probably a handgun. One could assume that the handgun will be worn in some sort of shoulder holster under your life preserver for easy access. Does anyone have any ideas regarding a holster that would work for the situation?
I have a hill people chest rig that could be used, depending on the style of life vest. There are some very low profile / lightweight ones out there. Though in a survival situation, I may not wear one so that I could bail out and swim under water if necessary.
 
Old 01-23-2020, 10:33 AM   #19
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I have a hill people chest rig that could be used, depending on the style of life vest. There are some very low profile / lightweight ones out there. Though in a survival situation, I may not wear one so that I could bail out and swim under water if necessary.
What comes to mind is the JF Kennedy and the PT109 scenario. You can get a life preserver that holds minimal survival gear, but you need something with you that you can use as immediate self defense, where a rifle secured in a dry bag doesn't give you that.
 
Old 01-23-2020, 12:15 PM   #20
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What comes to mind is the JF Kennedy and the PT109 scenario. You can get a life preserver that holds minimal survival gear, but you need something with you that you can use as immediate self defense, where a rifle secured in a dry bag doesn't give you that.
that's where the chest rig comes into play - can secure a side arm easily and keep it out of the way in an pocket that pulls open when you gram a corner and yank on it.
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