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Old 03-02-2018, 01:21 PM   #41
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I guess from one view it would look Ark like. If you need to start gathering Animals 2X2, I have a couple of Feral Cat's I can spare.
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Old 03-03-2018, 05:25 AM   #42
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No thanks. Already have two cats; both grey, one fat and one skinny. Probably getting into goats next year though, assuming we get a place built for them safe from coyotes or else make it fit for a donkey, which will in turn keep coyotes away.

Lot of ripple effects in hillbilly living...
 
Old 03-12-2018, 01:22 PM   #43
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Got the wiring for can lights, other porch lights, and porch fan done weekend before last. The metal-building contractor assured us he'll have his part completely done by the end of this week.

Now the basement hvac ductwork is finished, all the windows are in, I got the wall sheathing up on the downstairs exterior walls (covered in plastic in the pics above), and started the insulation this weekend after burning a bunch of brush and a big part of the downed oak tree to make way for running septic field lines.
 
 
Old 03-16-2018, 12:11 PM   #44
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Little by little...

Back side again. Finally have the windows & doors cut in, the soffit, gutters & downspouts in place, and wall sheathing (instead of plastic) up on the downstairs living space walls:



Front; incomplete but in progress. Really think we're going to love the porch space:
 
Old 03-17-2018, 02:14 AM   #45
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looking good!
 
Old 04-15-2018, 01:02 PM   #46
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Working on the insulation this weekend. Most foam-insulation contractors that I've spoken with recommend 1 1/2 inches in the walls, some recommending as little as 1 inch. Since overkill is underrated, in the walls we're going with 2 inches of closed-cell XPS, the same type & thickness of insulation as used in Yeti coolers. Using Dow "Foamular" XPS closed-cell foam insulation in the 2-inch sheets, individually cut to fit the stud cavity spaces, then using an expanding spray version of closed-cell foam (from FoamItGreen) to fill in gaps & edges, and to trim around boxes, pipes & other penetrations. (This is all basement.) If the perspective looks odd, it's because these two are 2x6 walls, not 2x4:




The horizontal spray-foam lines are where the sheet foam was cut to let it slide into place behind the already-installed wiring. Filling in with the expanding spray foam after the fact, makes for a darn near perfect airtight seal at the penetrations for electrical boxes, outside water-bibs, etc, which is a very good thing imo.

I did do one small room with all spray-in insulation. The mechanical room, I didn't have any sheet insulation cut and in place and it seemed like a good place to experiment since cosmetics pretty much don't matter in there; we're not even going to sheetrock the inside of that room, it just houses the hvac, water heater and one breaker panel. I wasn't sure if the hybrid approach I was using (cut sheets, trimmed & filled with spray) was much more efficient or effective than just spraying the whole thing, so that's why I tried spraying that one room. After doing so, gonna stick with the hybrid approach. Trying to get a consistent depth and coverage was about impossible for me since I'd never done it before, and since my nature is to err on the side of 'too much' insulation, it turned out less efficient as well. I'm sure it's functionally fine, but it took more time and made more mess, and probably didn't save any money in the process. Just 2x4 walls in this case:


Only about one-fourth done at this point. Still have the entire ceiling to do, the header gaps between the truss ends, and some walls as well. But so far, happy with the FoamItGreen stuff in general and with the hybrid sheet-&-spray approach in particular.

Last edited by John in AR; 04-15-2018 at 01:10 PM.
 
Old 04-15-2018, 01:05 PM   #47
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A couple cautions on the spray foam. It's VERY sticky when setting up, and gets a little hot for a minute or two when setting up as well; the two components mix at the nozzle tip when sprayed, and it generates a surprising amount of heat, but for just a minute or two. No real problems of any kind, not hot enough to hurt the insulation on cabling or anything. On the 'very sticky' thing, it's VERY STICKY. Wear a tyvek or similar suit, wear gloves, wear shoe covers, and cover up anything you wouldn't spray GreatStuff foam on, because that's basically what you're doing. Also absolutely wear a good respirator with a combination vapor/particulate cartridge. The fumes are definitely stronger than when spraying paint or such; I broke out the powered PAPR unit for the first time in a long time and was glad to have it.

And unless you want to provide your wife with further evidence that she's married to a retarded oaf, don't forget to put the hood up on your coveralls. I forgot one time for a few minutes, and it cost me. That stuff does eventually wash out, but not easily. (Yes, that's my pocket knife in my t-shirt pocket. The coveralls had no pockets, and that was the only place I could put it relatively easy to reach.)
 
Old 04-19-2018, 05:40 AM   #48
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Nothing exciting the last few days. Met with an engineer on site yesterday to look into some additional (possibly unnecessary) steel seismic cross-tie reinforcement, and got septic lines mostly installed.

Ordered the transfer switch yesterday for the storm cellar. It has a 60-amp subpanel in it, and this transfer switch is to be inline between the subpanel and the main service panel, to allow powering the storm cellar circuits from solar (and possibly wind) off-grid source. Not anything huge off-grid wise, just enough to run some lights, ventilation fan, and a few convenience appliances; not trying to power the whole house off grid or anything.

Transfer switches have also come WAY down in price it turns out. A 60-amp Reliance unit only runs $89 nowadays if you shop around. I didn't realize how much they'd dropped until I started shopping last week.
 
Old 04-19-2018, 09:35 AM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John in AR View Post
Nothing exciting the last few days. Met with an engineer on site yesterday to look into some additional (possibly unnecessary) steel seismic cross-tie reinforcement, and got septic lines mostly installed.

Ordered the transfer switch yesterday for the storm cellar. It has a 60-amp subpanel in it, and this transfer switch is to be inline between the subpanel and the main service panel, to allow powering the storm cellar circuits from solar (and possibly wind) off-grid source. Not anything huge off-grid wise, just enough to run some lights, ventilation fan, and a few convenience appliances; not trying to power the whole house off grid or anything.

Transfer switches have also come WAY down in price it turns out. A 60-amp Reliance unit only runs $89 nowadays if you shop around. I didn't realize how much they'd dropped until I started shopping last week.
John, you seem to know a lot about construction, so I'm to pose a question to you. My Son want's to buy a Bass Boat measuring 23'10". The problem is that his garage is only 22'10" in depth. The garage can't be extended back since it is in front of his living room. How hard and expensive would it be to bring the front of the garage out? To angle the boat to fit would take up the entire two car garage, so his Wife is not ok with that. If you have any ideas, I would like to hear them. Thanks, Terry
 
Old 04-20-2018, 08:07 AM   #50
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Originally Posted by Terry G View Post
...My Son want's to buy a Bass Boat measuring 23'10". The problem is that his garage is only 22'10" in depth. The garage can't be extended back since it is in front of his living room. How hard and expensive would it be to bring the front of the garage out? To angle the boat to fit would take up the entire two car garage, so his Wife is not ok with that. If you have any ideas, I would like to hear them. Thanks, Terry
Only can think of two answers, and one of them is probably going to sound sarcastic.

First is do as you say - extend the front of the garage a foot, and could be done one of three ways that I can think of. Either (A) extend the whole thing, or just extend one of the two roll-up doors. If extending just one door, two ways that I can think of for that. First (B) would be simple 'picture-frame' framing and the door shoved out by itself the way some kitchen garden windows are. Liable to be a lot less expensive than extending the entire front of the building, because that would involve siding, roofing, everything. But it would give a weird-looking finished product when done, with one door extended out like that. Last way (C) to extend one door would be to extend that half of the garage overall, including roof & all:


That would be more expensive than just picture-framing just the door itself a foot, but would probably look better.

Second idea - which may sound sarcastic but isn't meant to be - would be much simpler and cheaper. Buy a boat a foot shorter..?
 
Old 04-20-2018, 09:28 AM   #51
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Thanks John, and your right. He's going to re-think the boat size. What we didn't consider is height. The boat sitting on the trailer with two 8 foot power poles is too high to fit anyway. Glad he didn't buy it and THEN think of these things! Thanks again. Maybe a pole building?

Last edited by Terry G; 04-20-2018 at 12:19 PM.
 
Old 04-20-2018, 01:29 PM   #52
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Get the tilting poles. No such thing as a shorter boat! Does trailer have a folding tongue. sometimes that is enough. Knock the wall out an extend boat into living room, easier to change props that way!
 
Old 04-20-2018, 02:36 PM   #53
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Actually, Phoenix DOES have a 20 Footer, but finding a used one in Wisconsin is like finding a Colt SAA with a two digit serial number. The trailer does have the folding tongue, still too long. As far as knocking the wall down, I think he want's to stay married.
 
Old 04-23-2018, 10:06 AM   #54
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Got the permanent meter/disconnect for electrical-utility service purchased and installed, got the septic lines finished & covered, and bought a whole bunch of the xps foam sheets this weekend; 44 more of the 2" for most of the space, and five thinner 1-inch for one small divider (non-exterior) concrete wall. Had to hit two different Home Depot stores, each an hour away, to get all we needed.

Also, found out last week that the specific LED lights my wife wanted on the porch were a Lowe's-only thing (not even available online elsewhere), so even though it's way out of planned sequence I bought and installed them this weekend as well. Didn't want to gamble that they wouldn't be discontinued, changed, or jacked up in price before we got to them, so we just went ahead and got them now.

If anyone is looking for some, am so far very impressed with these, especially at their (imo) ridiculously low cost. https://www.lowes.com/pd/Utilitech-6...-in/1000208099

Roughly nine dollars apiece plus tax if you buy them in the six-pack, and can be had in either 2,700K or 5,000K light spectrum. We initially bought one of each to test, and after looking at them side by side, decided on the warmer 2,700K temp. They're also dimmable, which a lot of LED's aren't.
 
Old 04-23-2018, 11:58 AM   #55
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Quote:
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...The boat sitting on the trailer with two 8 foot power poles is too high to fit anyway...
I don't speak boat. What are "8 foot power poles"..?
 
Old 04-23-2018, 01:18 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by John in AR View Post
I don't speak boat. What are "8 foot power poles"..?
They are power driven poles mounted on ether side of motor. At the touch of a button or switch they will immediately anchor your boat where you just got a strike, for example. Also, with "Spot" device, as I understand it, you touch a device and a GPS in conjunction with the trolling motor returns you automatically to where you jus t were. Say you trolling along, stop, cast and get a fish. You hit the "Spot" device, land your fish, and tell the device to take back to the exact spot via the GPS. Now hit you power poles and anchor. I take my boat out, look for a good spot, then throw a line out that's attached to a stick. I catch a lot of fish that way. My boat cost $15,000.00. That wouldn't buy the Electronics on the Phoenix my Son want's.
 
Old 04-23-2018, 03:14 PM   #57
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There is one style.
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Old 04-24-2018, 07:10 AM   #58
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Quote:
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They are power driven poles mounted on ether side of motor. At the touch of a button or switch they will immediately anchor your boat where you just got a strike, for example. Also, with "Spot" device, as I understand it, you touch a device and a GPS in conjunction with the trolling motor returns you automatically to where you jus t were. Say you trolling along, stop, cast and get a fish. You hit the "Spot" device, land your fish, and tell the device to take back to the exact spot via the GPS. Now hit you power poles and anchor. I take my boat out, look for a good spot, then throw a line out that's attached to a stick. I catch a lot of fish that way. My boat cost $15,000.00. That wouldn't buy the Electronics on the Phoenix my Son want's.
Interesting. Never heard of them.
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Originally Posted by BigBassMan View Post
There is one style.



Looks like some kind of alien-robot movie villain...
 
Old 04-30-2018, 12:14 PM   #59
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Got the electric-service underground conduit finished last week, and the utility company sent out a tech to inspect it this morning and gave it their stamp of approval. Also got the underground water line done from the meter box to the house. Inside plumbing isn't finished (not yet hardly started), but have water line at least into the basement storm cellar, so the storm cellar half-bath toilet is functional. Not a big deal to me as I don’t a bit mind peeing outside, but understandably a bigger deal to my wife.

Now we can fill in the two trenches that basically run from the road to the house, and will be able to drive completely around the house once again once those trenches are gone.

I went an extra level of protection on the water line. Instead of just burying the typical ¾” pvc pipe, I first ran a 2” diameter pipe, and then put the ¾” inside of it to further protect it, primarily against rock punctures.

Numerous small things lately, including getting what should be the rest of the basement living-space insulation. Mostly 2” XPS with a small amount of 1” for a non-exterior divider wall. Stack got so tall I had to put some of it in another area to avoid blocking the breaker subpanel in the storage space.


 
Old 04-30-2018, 12:15 PM   #60
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At the meter box, got the ground rod driven as well. If anyone has ever driven a ground rod, they suck. I've only done three in my life before this one, and this time decided to find a better way than using a sledge hammer on a ladder. Found what turned out to be an UNBELIEVABLY easy way to drive them, thanks to several electrician-oriented forums and youtube. I bought an extra SDS-plus bit for our heavy hammer drill, cut the end of it off flat, and then had a guy weld a plumbing socket onto it. The socket keeps it from bouncing off the top of the rod, and it just drove that bad boy.

The three previous ground rods I've driven took several hours each using a sledge hammer by hand. This took literally less than sixty seconds. It just walked that eight-foot steel rod into the ground like it was no big deal. HUGELY happy with the concept and thought I'd pass it along; wish I could take credit for the idea, but just something I found on the net.


Also installed conduit-hanging supports for where the service-entry cable traverses the basement near the ceiling along one of the i-beams. Lot of little things.
 
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