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Old 09-11-2007, 07:15 PM   #1
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AA-12 Automatic Shotgun

I was just watching Future Weapons on the military channel and featured was the AA-12 Combat shotgun.Talk about one bad ass weapon. First I ever heard of it. I guess its been in Development for a couple decades. I like what i'm seeing.. If it puts terror in haji im all for it
Introduction - Military Police System recently unveiled a must have weapon in the current CQB environment. The company out of Piney Flats, Tennessee has come out with a unique selectable (via a unique trigger) 12-gauge shotgun called the Auto Assault 12 Automatic Shotgun or AA-12 Automatic Shotgun. The AA name originally stood for "Atchisson Assault" after the original inventor but has been changed since Military Police Systems purchased the rights to the unique weapon. The weapon utilizes a constant recoil system that reduces recoil by 90% as compared to a traditional 12 gauge shotgun. The reduction is recoil is the primary reason that this shotgun can be fired effectively in the automatic mode. With little or no barrel rise, this weapon is a monster when clearing rooms! The weapon will definitely become a force multiplier with its ease of operation and massive firepower in both the law enforcement and military arenas. What is Constant Recoil? - When the weapon's gun bolt is cycling a round, a gas system absorbs most of the shock and energy, about 80% of the total recoil. The weapon also has a very strong recoil spring that absorbs another 10% of the recoil. The result is a weapon that cycles efficiently and effortlessly while transferring 10% of the recoil of a normal 12 gauge to the shooter!







The Bottom Line - This weapon fills a void in the current military arsenal and could potentially change doctrine when it comes to CQB and urban operations. It has been said that the insurgents in Iraq do not fear a M16 but are very afraid of a shotgun. If this is true - the AA-12 should scare the hell out of them. A weapon that will fire 20 x #4 Buckshot 12 gauge shells in 4 seconds while spraying 540 .24 caliber pellets is bringing the smoke. Clearing a room with known enemy targets will forever be changed when employing this capability. You mean I get to carry a fully auto 12 gauge that doesn't need cleaning, fires a 20 round drum in 4 seconds and can be fired from a hummer because of the length - that's what every military ground pounder would love to hear on a deployment.! Shotgun able to fire 360 rounds per minute !!
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AA-12 Automatic Shotgun-aa12shotgun.jpg   AA-12 Automatic Shotgun-aa-12-shotgun2.jpg  

Last edited by Gunners762; 09-11-2007 at 07:32 PM.
 
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Old 09-11-2007, 07:17 PM   #2
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Shotgun able to fire 360 rounds per minute

Like its predecessors, the sixth annual Armed Forces Journal Shoot-out at Blackwater drove home a fundamental truth about the small arms industry and related enterprises: It’s a creative sector of the defense industrial base. This is particularly true of programs percolating in some of the smaller companies, especially activities aimed at developing weapons and other items tailored to the needs of U.S. troops fighting in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Along with some new, high-powered sniper systems, cutting-edge assault weapons and improved pistol designs from major firearms industries, Shoot-out ’05 gave several of these smaller enterprises an opportunity to highlight their products for an elite group of military evaluators and about a dozen observers from federal agencies.

SMOKE-BRINGER

Among the weapons at this year’s gathering was a low-recoil, full-auto, 12-gauge shotgun. After watching several ammo demonstrations, our guests turned their attention to that gun, which carries the tells-little moniker of AA-12. Sure, “Auto Assault 12” gives some indication of what the high-capacity, fully automatic 12-gauge shotgun can do, but this weapon deserves better — something like the “Smoke-bringer.” That was the first name that came to life after Jerry Baber, the talented weapon designer who has elevated this gun to its present form, unleashed a smoke-bringin’ 20-round barrage of 12-gauge destruction in four seconds — all with little perceptible recoil. The gun feeds on 20-round drums and eight-round magazines.

AA-12: Read the evaluator comments | View the weapon specs

In fairness to Baber, his use of the AA-12 name tag acknowledges the developmental work done by the gun’s original designer, the late Max Atchisson. Before Baber acquired the rights to his smoke-bringer in 1987, the gun was known as the Atchisson Assault-12. It is now Baber’s property and is available only through his company, Military Police Systems Inc. of Piney Flats, Tenn.

Since acquiring rights to the AA-12, Baber figures that he and fellow craftsman Boje Cornels, assisted by Randy Cates, have made somewhere in the neighborhood of 200 changes to the original Atchisson design. However, Baber emphasizes, one element of the original gun remains unchanged — its low recoil.

When the gun’s bolt is cycling a round, a proprietary gas system absorbs most of the energy — about 80 percent — Baber said, and the gun’s long, strong recoil spring absorbs about 10 percent. The result is a substantially cushioned ammo-cycling action — one that transfers to a shooter only about 10 percent of the recoil usually felt from a 12-gauge shell.

The AA-12 also benefits from an innovative gas port design that keeps the weapon from fouling, and what Baber describes as aircraft-grade stainless steel metalwork that’s equivalent in composition, strength and tolerance to aerospace industry standards. As a result, he says, the AA-12 will fire thousands of rounds before (if ever) it needs cleaning, and it never needs lubricating. At the Shoot-out, Baber boasted that one of the guns being demonstrated had fired thousands of shells without a cleaning.

There’s so much that’s new and exciting about this gun that it could easily provide grist for a stand-alone article; however, in the interest of saving space, let’s go directly to what our evaluators had to say after watching Baber and a couple of volunteer shooters put it through its paces, then after firing it themselves.

“Gives new meaning to ‘painting the target,’” an evaluator said after seeing what a 20-round drum of 12-gauge, #4 buckshot shells (27 pellets per shell) did to 14 Birchwood Casey Shoot-N-C targets mounted on a 4-by-8 plywood panel. Dozens of yellow circles blossomed around pellet-strike holes on the targets’ black faces as the AA-12 hosed down the panel with 540 .24-caliber pellets in four seconds.

“Impressive performance,” another said of the gun’s 300 rounds per minute rate of fire. “Great, every squad needs one,” noted a third.

“I’m impressed by the gun and all the ammo that was shot,” said another. “It seemed very controllable. It could have very good applications, especially in close quarters.”

“No question about who was in control,” another said. “Using low-recoil buckshot rounds, it was very effective against the targets. There was little or no climb. On the downside, this is a weapon primarily suited for close quarters.”

It also would be useful in breaking up an ambush initiated from close range in an urban area against either a mounted or dismounted patrol, evaluators said.

With an 18-inch barrel, the gun’s overall length is 38 inches. An AA-12 variant that Baber calls the CQB — for close-quarters battle — has a 13-inch barrel, giving it an overall length of 33 inches (the same length as an M-4 with the stock extended). That’s compact enough to swing around inside a Humvee or to quickly thrust out the window of a moving SUV.

With an 18-inch barrel, the AA-12 weighs 10.5 pounds; the 13-inch barrel cuts a half pound off that weight.

After watching the AA-12 chew up targets on the first day, evaluators were primed to try their hand with the gun. And after firing it, their comments generally reflected their initial impressions.

“Best shotgun I’ve ever fired. The cyclic rate of fire is perfect,” one said.

“This weapon would be tremendous in the hands of our soldiers,” said another. “In urban combat, this system could be a decisive factor.”

The vast majority of evaluators expressed similar sentiments. But a few either expressed reservations about the AA-12 or offered suggestions for improving it. “It’s a solution looking for a problem,” said one. “It is an excellent weapon concept,” said another, “but is it applicable to tactical situations?”

Suggested improvements included adding a forward-mounted pistol grip to eliminate what little barrel rise is experienced with the gun, and designing a better sighting system for use with longer-range 12-gauge slugs.

“It will work best in a defensive military role,” an evaluator said, “but ammo will be the biggest problem. It is a strong contender for use in barricade situations where no hostages are involved. The designer claims it will cycle breaching rounds; someone should develop a variety of rounds, including high-explosive shells and penetrators.”

In fact, such rounds are undergoing testing for the Marine Corps, although only in 3-inch shell length; the AA-12, as now designed, accepts only 2¾-inch shells. Baber said FRAG-12 shells, manufactured by Action Manufacturing of Philadelphia, are available in high-explosive blast and fragmentation rounds, along with a high-explosive, armor-piercing type. We’ll have to see about slipping some of these into next year’s Shoot-out lineup.

APTLY NAMED



Polyshok 12-guage ammo

Military Police Systems’ AA-12 wasn’t the only 12-gauge gun heard from on the Shoot-out’s first day. Polyshok Inc. of Panama City, Fla., put on what several evaluators rated as the best-orchestrated demonstration at this year’s Shoot-out. And, although a shotgun figured prominently during Polyshok’s demo, it was the 12-gauge ammo that held our evaluators’ interest.

Polyshok 12-guage ammo: Read the evaluator comments | View the weapon specs

Polyshok’s Impact Reactive Projectile (IRP), available only to military, law-enforcement and security personnel, is advertised as delivering the accuracy and stopping power of a 12-gauge slug with substantially less recoil and significantly reduced chances of causing collateral damage.

Against barriers that included 16-gauge steel (just under 1/8 inch), plywood, drywall and water jugs, in various combinations, the patented “timed expansion rounds” consistently punched through and dissipated virtually all of their energy on the targeted material. The payloads in these 12-gauge shells expand at a consistent rate, regardless of the medium they encounter.

Regular glass panels that were set up 11 feet behind the targets were sprayed with debris from impacts but weren’t even cracked.

Polyshok Vice President Jim Middleton told AFJ that IRP rounds are effective against body armor and auto glass.

In what’s tantamount to the highest form of praise at a Shoot-out, not a single negative comment was recorded about how the Polyshok demo was conducted or how the IRP ammo performed.

“Damn,” an evaluator said after watching the demo. “If this ammo isn’t [in the inventory] now, it should be. It’s definitely impressive, not only for military applications but also for police work, and it has outstanding safety applications.”

“It’s like a non-explosive shaped charge,” another said of the 540-grain, timed expansion round. “Small entry hole; larger exit hole. Effectively ‘killed’ the target behind steel. Very impressive; unexpected results.”

“Remarkable versatility,” a third evaluator noted. “It’s a great round for situations when civilians are present, especially during military operations in urban terrain and law-enforcement operations.”

“It’s impressive how the round worked equally well on Sheetrock and steel, without damaging the glass,” another said. “The timed expansion made a neat, 1-inch entry hole in the first wall and a 3-inch exit hole in the second wall but did not damage the glass.”

One of his colleagues summed up the demo results by echoing comments Middleton made before the demo: “A safe round for making entry — helps prevent collateral casualties. It has the punch you need to be lethal; the fragmentation and energy expenditure needed for safety beyond the threat.”

http://www.armedforcesjournal.com/bl.../?s=2005_main1
 
Old 09-11-2007, 11:29 PM   #3
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OH,MAN,DUDE!!! it's a 'FLAT-OUT KILLER CONCEPT' SOON TO BEAR-FRUIT!!!!


as, the "FRAG-12" LOADING/CARTRIDGE is BEING MANUFACTURED as 'we' slumber/cyber!!!,,,,brother, go 'google' BLACKFIVE.COM[ha!] that 'weblog' is kinda cool/HIGHLIGHTS-LINKS.

as their is IN DEVELOPMENT 'A' 86" long R.C. 'toy-helocopter' ARMED WITH A "PAIR OF THEM 'death dealin' auto scatter-guns'!
 
Old 09-12-2007, 03:30 AM   #4
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Remember the Streetsweeper? I don't think civilians will ever own even a semi-auto AA-12. Too bad, I want one.

RIKA
 
Old 09-12-2007, 09:13 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by RIKA
Remember the Streetsweeper?I don't think civilians will ever own even a semi-auto AA-12. Too bad, I want one.

RIKA
I sure do remember the Street-sweeper/Striker-12. My buddy rob his father in law used to have one back in the 1980's. His father in law used to have a incredable collection of weapons , MAC10/11 ,UZI , WALTHER MPK Machine pistols. Great guy but he since passed on. I guess we have to settle for a IZHMASH Saiga-12 . The AA-12 is pretty cool set up.
http://www.armedforcesjournal.com/bl...2005_specs#416
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AA-12 Automatic Shotgun-aa12.jpg   AA-12 Automatic Shotgun-streetsweeper2.jpg  

Last edited by Gunners762; 01-11-2008 at 07:54 AM.
 
Old 09-15-2007, 08:13 AM   #6
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Another interesting combat shotgun design is the Daewoo (Shotgun USAS-12) http://world.guns.ru/shotgun/sh16-e.htm
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AA-12 Automatic Shotgun-usas-12withkit.jpg  
 
Old 09-24-2007, 04:49 AM   #7
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I was never around for the streetsweeper, but having read about it... There really isn't any reason why it should be illegal.

I never did like the way the BATF rules on shotguns... I think I saw that the USAS 12 was banned, as well as the AA-12. No complaints here- I've heard that both are super- heavy.

The Saiga 12 has caught my eye, but it has no bolt hold open... I was looking at the Vepr 12 as well, but I couldn't get much word on whether it would show up in the US at all...
 
Old 01-11-2008, 07:43 AM   #8
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Pretty Kewl Made By Cobray

Here is another rare and unknown shotgun. “Cobray had only made 22 of these shotguns, with only 5 shipped, when ATF shut them down in 1982. Of the 5 that made it out, only 2 are known to still exist …” NOT NFA, and fires from an open bolt, like nearly all belt-fed machine guns. Read More Here: http://www.openbolt.com/ And Link for its Gunbroker Auction listing: http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...?Item=89216053
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AA-12 Automatic Shotgun-cobray.jpg   AA-12 Automatic Shotgun-cobray2.jpg  

Last edited by Gunners762; 01-11-2008 at 10:08 AM.
 
Old 01-11-2008, 09:27 AM   #9
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That Cobray Slam fire shotgun is very interesting. It looks like a single shot. Does anyone know? Incidentally, I looked the Openbolt website and saw this blurb quoted as historical fact:

"Of historical interest: The British Secret Service put out an instruction sheet for captured friendly forces in rapidly occupied European countries during WWII. The sheet detailed how to replace the existing firing pin on several European semi auto pistols with a slightly larger version that would create an intentional open bolt slam fire. When a soldier was about to be taken prisoner or executed, he locked the semi open in a "surrender" gesture, pointed it at the enemy, and when the bolt was released, the action closed and slam fired, emptying the clip in full auto from the open bolt, potentially allowing escape or "taking a few with me." God bless the brave ones who tried it!"

Now a lot of stranger weapons ideas occurred during WW2 including flying bats carrying incendiaries to burn up Jap citys (idea discarded as impractical). The above strikes me as a fantasy type old wives tale though. Any other ideas?

RIKA
 
Old 01-11-2008, 09:51 AM   #10
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Question

Something's a little off with that site's info on the Cobray single shot.

As I remember those in the mid to late 80's showing up at Gun Shows and a few gun & pawn type shops in my area.

I saw enough of them to think they made and shipped more than 22?

But now I'm kicking myself for passing on getting one if that is correct.

Tho, it never did impress me in feel, fit or finish. And reminded me of a factory made pipe-gun.

Or, did they make a similar one later to satisfy the ATF? Or maybe the company name change re-organization had something to do with it? As I've seen MAC-10's and 11's under at least 2-3 different names.
 
Old 01-11-2008, 10:18 AM   #11
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Quote:
All open bolt designs after 1982 are now banned, unless grandfathered as pre-ban like this gun. Q: “We saw both the full auto and the 30 round Slamfires at the Phoenix machine gun show, and they said those were the only two left. Is this the same model?” A: Yes, this is the foundation for both of those guns, however this is factory original single with NO semi or auto modifications. If you intend to modify it, you will likely need NFA paper, depending on what you do.
it would be interesting to see the magazine fed version though.. Thats if they didn't make way to the scrap box. ..
Quote:
Or, did they make a similar one later to satisfy the ATF? Or maybe the company name change re-organization had something to do with it? As I've seen MAC-10's and 11's under at least 2-3 different names.
- There was a Striker 12 design made under Sentinal Arms. The "Street Sweeper" was made by Cobray. . From what i found, The "Street Sweeper" was Cobray's knock off of the "Striker 12 " that was first made in South Africa as the Armsel Striker & designed by Hilton Walker. The Street Sweeper was not as well made as the Striker 12. Cobray/SWD Streetsweaper- A clone of the Armsel Striker, notable for having a limited parts commonality to the original weapons system. This might be the case for this Cobray Single shot slam fire model with its different variations. The South African Armson OEG version of Striker 12 was offered by Penn Arms. Penn Arms Link: http://www.pennarms.com/striker_data_page.htm
Sentinel Arms Corporation im not sure how thry came into play.

Last edited by Gunners762; 01-11-2008 at 01:23 PM. Reason: Beer
 
Old 01-11-2008, 11:53 AM   #12
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More Info

The Striker shotgun was originally designed in the early 1980s by the someone Hilton Walker from Rhodesia. After the fall of Rhodesia he moved to the South African Republic, where he continued the development of his counter-insurgency, high capacity combat shotgun. First production models of his shotgun, named "Striker", were made during the mid-1980s, and found its way from the South Africa and into the USA, and other countries. The key advantages of the Striker shotgun were its large magazine capacity, which is doubled the traditional shotguns magazine capacity of that time, and rapid-fire capability. On the other hand, the rotary cylinder-type magazine was bulky, very slow to reload, and the basic action was not without certain flaws. During the late 1980s Mr. Walker redesigned his shotgun, getting rid of its watch clock-like cylinder rotation mechanism, and replaced it with manually operated cylinder rotating mechanism, linked to the side-swinging vertical front grip. The rest of the features of the Striker, including the DAO trigger, cylinder design and top-folding butt, were retained, and the spent cases auto-ejection feature was added to speed up reloading. The shotguns of updated design, called "Protecta", are still manufactured in South Africa by the Reutech Defense Industries, and offered in various barrel lengths, ranging from 171 mm (Protecta Bulldog) to the 760 mm, and with various finishes. I must admit that the most bizarre firearm I've ever seen was the gold-plated Protecta (with huge, gold-plated muzzle brake), which was sold in one of the central Russian gun shops in Moscow for local equivalent of the several thousands of US dollars.
The key advantage of the Striker and Protecta shotguns is their large magazine capacity, but the price for this advantage is an increased bulk of the weapon and slower reloading, especially when compared to the recent box magazine-fed combat shotguns, like Italian Franchi SPAS-15 or Russian Saiga-12. This gun, especially in its earlier Striker form, is also much more dangerous to the shooter in the case of the hang-fire, because the "skipped", hang-fired round will remain in the cylinder until removed manually, and may cause damage to the shooter if exploded not behind the barrel. The current US firearms laws listed the Striker and Protecta shotguns, as well as the Streetsweeper (an US-made Striker copy), as a destructive devices, which require special paperwork to be obtained by civilians. In some other countries (like the Russia) the Protecta shotguns can be sold to civilians only with barrels of certain lengths, and with two chambers blocked to maintain allowed 10-rounds capacity limit.
Technical description.
The Striker shotgun is based on the basic revolver scheme, but with some important improvements. In the conventional double action revolver handguns cylinder is rotated when the trigger is pressed in DA mode or when the hammer is cocked in the SA mode. Since the Striker used more or less conventional DAO trigger, and a very large and heavy cylinder (compared to handguns), the trigger pull for the conventional design could be really terrible. So, the Walker used the pre-wounded clock-work spring, located inside the cylinder, around its axis, to rotate the cylinder. The spring is wound using a large winding key, located at the front of the cylinder housing, after the cylinder is loaded with shells. When trigger is pressed, it withdraws the cylinder stop bar, which releases one of the cylinder studs, located under the each chamber on the rear cylinder wall, so the spring rotates cylinder until the next stud is engaged with the cylinder stop. This system, while allowing a really rapid fire, and maintaining acceptable trigger pull, was prone to skipping more than one chamber with partial trigger pulls, and required a spring to be wound after each magazine reloading, further slowing down the already lengthy reloading process.
The cylinder was made from two plates (front and rear), which hold 12 separate chambers together. Cylinder is removed from the gun only for cleaning and maintenance, the loading and reloading is commenced via the loading gate at the rear right side of the aluminum cylinder housing. To remove spent cases or unfired rounds, a spring-loaded ejector rod is fixed to the right side of the barrel casing, much like on the old-time single-action revolvers.
The top-folding butt is made from sheet metal, the front vertical grip and the rear pistol grip, integral with the trigger unit housing are made from plastic. The Protecta shotgun has a manually rotating cylinder instead of the clock-spring clockwork. The front vertical grip can be swung to the right and back. This movement will rotate a barrel shroud and a pivoting arm, linked to it, which, in turn, will rotate a cylinder for 1/12 of turn, to place a next chamber behind the barrel. The spent cases are ejected automatically from the chamber at the moment of the next shot, by using a small amount of powder gases propelled back from the fired chamber. The last spent case (or unfired cartridges) can be removed using the spring-loaded ejector rod at the right side of the barrel. The reloading of the empty chambers is commenced via the loading gate, similar to one found on Striker shotguns. SOURCE: http://world.guns.ru/shotgun/sh09-e.htm
 
Old 01-11-2008, 12:24 PM   #13
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Thinking on it the single shot ones I'm thinking of seemed very awkward to load and unload. I think one of the companies might have made a change or a totaly new design that kinda looked like the original but really was not.
One I saw was demo'ed so to speak with a 12ga snap cap and it seemed like a Rube Goldberg system for loading and cocking. I do remember thinking "Hey this ain't no where as simple as what I originaly saw in a few gunrags."
 
Old 01-11-2008, 12:54 PM   #14
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BTW- Bill Holmes lives or lived(not sure if the old coot is still alive) in my area and used to do the gun show circut around here so I may have the Cobray mixed up with one of his contraptions.
 
Old 01-11-2008, 01:41 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by BigEd63 View Post
Thinking on it the single shot ones I'm thinking of seemed very awkward to load and unload. I think one of the companies might have made a change or a totaly new design that kinda looked like the original but really was not.
One I saw was demo'ed so to speak with a 12ga snap cap and it seemed like a Rube Goldberg system for loading and cocking. I do remember thinking "Hey this ain't no where as simple as what I originaly saw in a few gunrags."
This Cobray slam-fire is the first i ever saw and probably the last. You can say one thing , its defintally an unique piece of firearms history. If Cobray had its hand in other fire arms designs other then the slam-fire , StreetSweeper and Mac10's -11's etc..I don't know of any others. It appears that Cobray is still in the replacment parts bus but no longer selling complet firearms. (http://www.cobray.com/) I wonder why the feds raided them back in 1982? And whats the deal with Sentinal Arms? Importer? MFG? Can't find any info on these guys.
 
Old 01-11-2008, 03:44 PM   #16
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I don't recall Sentinal Arms, but like I said it seems like in the 80's there were more than one of those places doing some odd stuff and changing names. Wish i had a collection of the Shotgun News from back then.

Ever see a MAC-10 semi-auto carbine? Or the later M-11 ones? Now those were different. And I'm not talking a pistol with a stock and barrel extension added either. But I don't remember under whose name. And i do believe both were closed bolt operation.
 
Old 01-11-2008, 04:13 PM   #17
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? Masterpiece Arms ? Leinad ? Vulcan Arms ?

Manufacturer Model Caliber Features

Military Armament Corp. M10 9mm open bolt SMG
Military Armament Corp. M10 45acp open bolt SMG
Military Armament Corp. M11 380acp open bolt SMG
RPB Industries M10 9mm open bolt SMG
RPB Industries M10 45acp open bolt SMG
RPB Industries M11 380acp open bolt SMG
RPB Industries M10 9mm open bolt pistol
RPB Industries M10 45acp open bolt pistol
RPB Industries M11 380acp open bolt pistol
MAC, Stephensville, TX M10 9mm open bolt SMG
MAC, Stephensville, TX M10 45acp open bolt SMG
SWD Inc. M11 9mm open bolt SMG
SWD Inc. M11A1 380acp open bolt SMG
SWD Inc. M10 9mm/45 open bolt SMG*
Jersey Arms M10 9mm open bolt SMG
Jersey Arms M10 45acp open bolt SMG
Erquiaga Arms Co. M10 9mm SMG
Section Five Ltd M10 9mm British made SMG
Hatton Industries S-701 (MAC-10) 45acp made for Jersey Arms
*SWD purchased frames from MAC, Stephensville, TX (Leatherwood) and built them up using RPB and Cobray manufactured parts.
 
Old 01-11-2008, 05:01 PM   #18
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And also I recall a stainless steel MAC type pistol/SMG but have no idea who offered it or if it ever made it to any siginificant production. Just was in some report on one of the Shot Shows in some old gun rag.
 
Old 01-17-2008, 06:33 PM   #19
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There was a Slam-fire for sale on IIRC Gunbroker a few weeks ago..i THINK the going price was around 20-25K when i saw the auction.
 
Old 01-17-2008, 10:07 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunners762 View Post
The company out of Piney Flats, Tennessee
Piney Flats, TN is right in the middle of my stomping ground. What is the name of the company. I may know the people personally.
 
Old 01-27-2008, 01:02 PM   #21
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THE AUTO ASSAULT-12: A Killer Shotgun for the War on Terror It is a well-known fact that terrorists killing our troops in Iraq are not afraid of the M4 and its 5.56mm bullet -- but they are terrified of shotguns. Enter the AA-12. No felt recoil, high explosive rounds, gas-forged and heat-treated, this shotgun may give terrorists a run for their money.

Text and Photos By Gary Paul Johnston
Soldier of Fortune Magazine

Throughout the history of firearms, those firing multiple projectiles have always proven enormously effective at close-to-medium ranges out to 50 yards and beyond. This was especially true where cannons fired musket-size shot instead of cannon balls, although the latter was also deadly against enemy forces in formation.

Because of the advantages of the shotgun in close-quarter battles and the great fear it instilled in those who came up against it, this family of weapons continued to evolve through the centuries. Double-barrel shotguns were used with great success during the 19th Century and the slide action (or pump) repeating shotgun began its legendary career with the U.S. Military during the Philippine Insurrection against Moro terrorists. Its reputation was reinstated in the “trench warfare” of World War I, with the 12-gauge Model 97 Winchester.
Continuing its service during World War II, the Model 97 was joined by the more modern pump-action Winchester Model 12 and the semi-automatic Browning, this time in the jungles of the Pacific Theater. During the Vietnam War, a number of pump and semi-automatic shotguns were pressed into service by the U.S. military, many of which remain in inventory.

Law-enforcement agencies throughout America have adopted and issued even more shotguns than the military. Often referred to as “riot” guns, these many models have closely paralleled their military counterparts, usually having barrels 18 inches or so in length. The shotgun is equally popular with America’s prison system, not to mention millions of Americans who want an utterly capable weapon for home defense.

While relatively few pump-action shotguns are issued by the military today, semi-automatic models still are, such as the Binneli Model 10-14. Like virtually all other shotguns used by the military over the years, this was one based on a civilian shotgun used for hunting and competition shooting. However, it was equipped with a retractable butt stock and a pistolgrip especially for the United States Marine Corps.


The Atchisson Assault-12

More than a quarter of a century ago the late Max Atchisson developed a unique combat shotgun called the Atchisson Assault-12 (AA-12). A selective- fire weapon, the AA-12 fired from an open bolt and used either an 8- round box magazine or a 20-round drum. Atchisson also developed a prototype 40-round drum that was housed in a box to conceal exactly what it looked like.

Using a revolutionary design, the AA-12 had a straight-line synthetic stock with an integral pistol grip consisting of right and left sides that mated together when assembled. Being gas operated, the gun used a long-stroke piston, and locked with a single vertical lug reminiscent of some sporting semiautomatic shotguns. On its exterior, the AA-12 somewhat resembled the AR-15 rifle, which obviously influenced it. The AA-12 fired at the rate of about 300 rounds per minute (RPM).
Max Atchisson demonstrated his AA-12 for several years, but the project didn’t go anywhere, except in the hands of a con-artist who bilked several hundred people out of deposits on guns that were never produced. A few years later the AA-12 influenced the design of the Universal Sporting Automatic Shotgun-12 (USAS-12). Produced by DAEWOO, of South Korea, the USAS-12 used a 2-piece stock and fired from a closed bolt using a trigger system similar to that of the M16. When such guns were declared “destructive devices” no longer available to the public, production of them all but ceased.


Finally in 1987, Max Atchisson, broke and in danger of losing everything, sold the rights to the AA-12 to Mr. Jerry Baber, of MPS, Inc., in Tennessee. A brilliant engineer with a long history in the firearms business, Baber is also one of the world’s foremost experts in high-precision cast steel parts. With the acquisition of the rights and patents came all of Atchisson’s drawings of the AA-12, but not his AA-12 prototype.

Along with his partner, Boje Corneal, an equally talented German mechanical engineer, Jerry Baber began production of a small number of pre-production samples of the AA-12 for test purposes using Atchisson’s drawings. However, they soon discovered that the drawings were not to specification when the first complete AA-12 would not work, as built to print. Thus began an extensive redesign of the AA-12 that extended over an eighteen-year period with a total of no less than one hundred and eighty-eight (188) changes/improvements having been made to date. These changes have involved every aspect of the gun, except for one, and that is Atchisson’s original recoil spring. One of the most important and interesting is the gas port, which is like nothing I have ever seen before. The name of the gun was also changed to the Auto Assault-12.
During the interim, Baber and Corneal had businesses to operate, and Jerry Baber made parts for 39 gun companies at his B&H Precision foundry. Among these companies were Barrett Mfg., Freedom Arms, North American Arms, Shilo, Smith & Wesson, Cobray, Atagua, Charter Arms, and RAMO Corp. Ronnie Barrett describes Jerry Baber as a “master caster.”

In spite of their full schedules, Baber and Corneal continued work on the AA-12, finding more problems at each step of the way. After learning about a new state-of-the-art highspeed digital movie camera, Jerry Baber purchased it and a Savage Snail Bullet Trap to study the mechanism fired, in slow motion. This was the key to ironing out the final bugs in the gun and by the fall of 2004, 10 firing models of the AA- 12 were produced. Several of these guns were demonstrated to United States Marine Corps officers with extremely favorable results, and tests are also scheduled for the Army with additional interest by the Air Force, Navy and Coast Guard.

How It’s Made

In spending three days with Jerry Baber and Boje Corneal I learned more about casting and production technology than almost anyone would want to know, and much of it required my sworn secrecy. What I can tell you is that most major components of the AA-12 are precision cast from exotic aircraft stainless steel, using the lost wax process. However, during this process is a separate and unique operation that insures a part that is about 99.9 percent finished. When I asked Jerry Baber who else in the world uses this method he told me he invented it and it is a closely guarded secret. After being cast, the parts are gas forged to add integrity and strength. They then receive intermediate heat treatment before minor machining, and are then final heat-treated to an optimum Rockwell C hardness to insure optimum smoothness in operation and maximum wear. Much of the process is the same as that used in jet aircraft turbine technology.
Speaking of heat, the maximum temperature of the AA-12 has been measured at 256 degrees F at the gas port and 150 degrees F to the barrel. The glass-impregnated nylon stock will begin to melt at 450 degrees F to 475 F of heat, with deformation beginning just past 375 degrees F, so heat is not a factor with the gun.

Like Max Atchisson’s original design, the new AA-12 uses an 8-round box magazine and a 20-round drum, but are made of the same tough synthetic as the stock. While the new magazines resemble the original prototypes, many subtle improvements have been made to assure 100 percent reliability. In fact, Jerry Baber showed me cases of 400 AA-12 8-shot magazine bodies that were to be scrapped because of a single minor improvement that had been made. The 8-round box and 20-round drum are the only feed devices that will be offered for the gun, although a 32-round drum has been designed. A means of attaching two 8-round magazines side by side is not out of the question.

The magazines are inserted into a channel similar to that used on the Thompson SMG, and the magazine catch/release works like that of the M16 rifle. Pushing the release with the right index finger allows the magazine or drum to fall free. Insertion of fully loaded magazines is easy even with the bolt forward.

Also like the 1928 Thompson SMG, the AA-12 uses a topmounted cocking handle with a long extension that acts as a dust cover. At the front of the extension is a rocking piece that locks it forward until pulled back with the palm of the support hand. This cocking handle does not reciprocate with the bolt and is pushed all the way back forward after cocking the bolt group to the rear. Mounted on the left side of the gun, the selector is moved to the forward position to allow the trigger to be pulled and it is moved to the rear to prevent the trigger from being pulled. An ambidextrous safety/selector is being considered.

Constant Recoil System

No, it doesn’t kick -- honestly. To all but eliminate felt recoil and movement of the AA-12 when fired, the gun uses what is called the “constant recoil” principal used by Mr. L. James Sullivan who also designed the AR-15 rifle for Eugene Stoner. Sullivan used the “constant recoil” system in the Ultimax LMG he designed for Chartered Industries of Singapore (CIS).

In the constant recoil system, the bolt group never bottoms out (slams into a fixed object) at the end of its rearward travel, but stops gradually against the long recoil spring. While it may be hard to believe without experiencing it, this gentle operation causes the AA-12 to have almost no felt recoil. The open bolt firing also dampens recoil, resulting in 95 percent control of the weapon.
While the basic design of the AA-12 incorporated an 18” barrel, a 16” barrel was also perfected, but a special unit of the Military asked if a 14” barrel were possible. Jerry Baber decided to go even shorter and perfected a 13” barrel for the AA-12 using a redesigned gas port. Called the CQB, this version has overall length that is the same as the M4 Carbine, and the barrel can easily be left at 14” if desired with plenty of dwell time left over. Baber has also designed a system where the butt stock can be shortened by 3” if desired, but this version would have slightly more felt recoil. Since the stock was out being prototyped at the time of my visit, I did not see it.

The sights of the AA-12 are mounted on towers to provide cheek weld, and are quite simple. The front sight is adjustable for elevation by turning it against friction from a nylon bushing, and the rear sight is adjustable for windage via a drum. Two types of rear ghost ring sights have been designed, one in a figure “8” for holdover, but standard ghost-ring aperture will be used.

Disassembly

At the front of the gas block is a locking collar for the square tubular recoil spring guide, and on it is an extension to accept a standard M16 bayonet. A collar is also available without the extension. The two halves of the stock are locked together by steel tabs on both sides of the butt, in the middle and behind the gas block, as well as at the rear sight and on the bottom of the pistol grip. Except for those at the gas block, these can either slide or swivel to lock in place.
The stock halves can be removed in seconds. Then with the magazine removed and the bolt allowed to go forward, the butt is pushed forward causing the recoil spring guide to protrude out the front of the gas block. The locking collar can then be removed and the butt, recoil spring guide and spring can then be allowed to exit from the rear under pressure. Once this assembly is removed, the piston/bolt carrier and bolt can be removed by pulling back on the charging handle. The handle can be removed out the front of the receiver and the bolt group can be disassembled if necessary. Using a simple pry tool, the barrel lock can be removed allowing the barrel to be removed and replaced with a different one for special- purpose missions.

Unless damaged, the sear housing, trigger and selector need never be removed. In fact, the same thing holds true for the entire weapon. This is because the special material it is made from requires no lubrication whatsoever. What’s more, the mechanism is selfcleaning even when contaminated by sand. In the worst-case scenario, a canteen (or similar) can be used to flush out the ejection port and everything in it. If this sounds too good to be true, you’ll just have to take my word for it.

Shots Fired

Having traveled to Tennessee to test the AA-12, I personally fired more than 500 rounds in two AA-12’s, and witnessed another 500 or so fired by seven others including two women who work in the B&H Precision foundry. Neither of these ladies had previously fired the AA-12 and they were more than a little nervous. The guns were fired from the hip, shoulder, with one hand, and upside down.

One of the AA-12’s we fired was the CQB model, and this little gun had more than 5,000 rounds fired through it and had never been cleaned, much less lubricated. One look at it and it was obvious. The entire mechanism was black with carbon and it was also totally dry. However, neither gun malfunctioned in any way during the shooting, most of which was done using low-brass target rounds, which are always a problem for self-loading shotguns, especially when dirty.

Except for the noise, shooting the target 12 ga. shells in the AA-12 was like shooting a .22 rimfire machinegun. Really! High brass buckshot and slugs produced more noise and a bigger muzzle flash from the CQB model, and also increased the cyclic rate, but the additional recoil generated was barely worth mentioning. It took the two ladies only a couple of short bursts before they were emptying 20-round drums without stopping, and they barely moved.

What was also impressive is that single and double shots could easily obtained because of the relatively slow cyclic rate of 300 rounds per minute. If two rounds were fired, they both hit in the same place out to 25 yards. Even CTS door-breaching rounds operated the AA-12, but when using less-lethal rounds the bolt must be cocked each time by hand. Hornady Manufacturing Company is looking into the possibility of other specialized 12-gauge ammunition.

It is a well-known fact that the Islamic terrorists killing our troops in Iraq are not afraid of the M4 and its 5.56mm bullet, but they are terrified of shotguns. You can imagine how they would react to the AA-12 with 20 rounds of buckshot, but that’s only half the story, as there is something far more effective.

Although there is currently no rail system on the AA-12, we mounted a SureFire X200 on the barrel using a Light Link from Mounting Solutions Plus. A hand-held SureFire light was also mounted using an E2 C G2 30mm scope mount from Abrams Small Arms Research (ASAR). Other mounting concepts are also being studied.

The FRAG-12
It is a well-known fact that terrorists killing our troops in Iraq are not afraid of the M4 and its 5.56mm bullet -- but they are terrified of shotguns. Enter the AA-12. No felt recoil, high explosive rounds, gas-forged and heat-treated, this shotgun may give terrorists a run for their money.

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[Have opinions on this article? Go to the Discussion Forum to sound off.]


Destructive device: The AA-12 and AA-12 CQB could very well have a dramatic effect on the Global War On Terrorism.

Text and Photos By Gary Paul Johnston
Soldier of Fortune Magazine

Throughout the history of firearms, those firing multiple projectiles have always proven enormously effective at close-to-medium ranges out to 50 yards and beyond. This was especially true where cannons fired musket-size shot instead of cannon balls, although the latter was also deadly against enemy forces in formation.

Because of the advantages of the shotgun in close-quarter battles and the great fear it instilled in those who came up against it, this family of weapons continued to evolve through the centuries. Double-barrel shotguns were used with great success during the 19th Century and the slide action (or pump) repeating shotgun began its legendary career with the U.S. Military during the Philippine Insurrection against Moro terrorists. Its reputation was reinstated in the “trench warfare” of World War I, with the 12-gauge Model 97 Winchester.

AA-12: The Skinny
Name:
Auto Assault-12

Killer Features:
  • Almost no felt recoil
  • Requires no lubrication
  • Maximum temperature measured at 256 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Self-cleaning even when contaminated by sand
  • Uses FRAG-12 cartridges, which consist of a family of 12 ga. High Explosive projectiles including a HE Blast round, a HE Fragmentation round and a High Explosive Armor Piercing (HEAP) projectile
Related Links:

More Weapons
Equipment Guide
AR-15



Continuing its service during World War II, the Model 97 was joined by the more modern pump-action Winchester Model 12 and the semi-automatic Browning, this time in the jungles of the Pacific Theater. During the Vietnam War, a number of pump and semi-automatic shotguns were pressed into service by the U.S. military, many of which remain in inventory.

Law-enforcement agencies throughout America have adopted and issued even more shotguns than the military. Often referred to as “riot” guns, these many models have closely paralleled their military counterparts, usually having barrels 18 inches or so in length. The shotgun is equally popular with America’s prison system, not to mention millions of Americans who want an utterly capable weapon for home defense.

While relatively few pump-action shotguns are issued by the military today, semi-automatic models still are, such as the Binneli Model 10-14. Like virtually all other shotguns used by the military over the years, this was one based on a civilian shotgun used for hunting and competition shooting. However, it was equipped with a retractable butt stock and a pistolgrip especially for the United States Marine Corps.

The Atchisson Assault-12

More than a quarter of a century ago the late Max Atchisson developed a unique combat shotgun called the Atchisson Assault-12 (AA-12). A selective- fire weapon, the AA-12 fired from an open bolt and used either an 8- round box magazine or a 20-round drum. Atchisson also developed a prototype 40-round drum that was housed in a box to conceal exactly what it looked like.

Using a revolutionary design, the AA-12 had a straight-line synthetic stock with an integral pistol grip consisting of right and left sides that mated together when assembled. Being gas operated, the gun used a long-stroke piston, and locked with a single vertical lug reminiscent of some sporting semiautomatic shotguns. On its exterior, the AA-12 somewhat resembled the AR-15 rifle, which obviously influenced it. The AA-12 fired at the rate of about 300 rounds per minute (RPM).



The original AA-12 (top) is seen with the shorter CQB version, along with both magazines.
Both guns proved totally easy to control.


Max Atchisson demonstrated his AA-12 for several years, but the project didn’t go anywhere, except in the hands of a con-artist who bilked several hundred people out of deposits on guns that were never produced. A few years later the AA-12 influenced the design of the Universal Sporting Automatic Shotgun-12 (USAS-12). Produced by DAEWOO, of South Korea, the USAS-12 used a 2-piece stock and fired from a closed bolt using a trigger system similar to that of the M16. When such guns were declared “destructive devices” no longer available to the public, production of them all but ceased.


Finally in 1987, Max Atchisson, broke and in danger of losing everything, sold the rights to the AA-12 to Mr. Jerry Baber, of MPS, Inc., in Tennessee. A brilliant engineer with a long history in the firearms business, Baber is also one of the world’s foremost experts in high-precision cast steel parts. With the acquisition of the rights and patents came all of Atchisson’s drawings of the AA-12, but not his AA-12 prototype.
Along with his partner, Boje Corneal, an equally talented German mechanical engineer, Jerry Baber began production of a small number of pre-production samples of the AA-12 for test purposes using Atchisson’s drawings. However, they soon discovered that the drawings were not to specification when the first complete AA-12 would not work, as built to print. Thus began an extensive redesign of the AA-12 that extended over an eighteen-year period with a total of no less than one hundred and eighty-eight (188) changes/improvements having been made to date. These changes have involved every aspect of the gun, except for one, and that is Atchisson’s original recoil spring. One of the most important and interesting is the gas port, which is like nothing I have ever seen before. The name of the gun was also changed to the Auto Assault-12.




During the interim, Baber and Corneal had businesses to operate, and Jerry Baber made parts for 39 gun companies at his B&H Precision foundry. Among these companies were Barrett Mfg., Freedom Arms, North American Arms, Shilo, Smith & Wesson, Cobray, Atagua, Charter Arms, and RAMO Corp. Ronnie Barrett describes Jerry Baber as a “master caster.”

In spite of their full schedules, Baber and Corneal continued work on the AA-12, finding more problems at each step of the way. After learning about a new state-of-the-art highspeed digital movie camera, Jerry Baber purchased it and a Savage Snail Bullet Trap to study the mechanism fired, in slow motion. This was the key to ironing out the final bugs in the gun and by the fall of 2004, 10 firing models of the AA- 12 were produced. Several of these guns were demonstrated to United States Marine Corps officers with extremely favorable results, and tests are also scheduled for the Army with additional interest by the Air Force, Navy and Coast Guard.

How It’s Made

In spending three days with Jerry Baber and Boje Corneal I learned more about casting and production technology than almost anyone would want to know, and much of it required my sworn secrecy. What I can tell you is that most major components of the AA-12 are precision cast from exotic aircraft stainless steel, using the lost wax process. However, during this process is a separate and unique operation that insures a part that is about 99.9 percent finished. When I asked Jerry Baber who else in the world uses this method he told me he invented it and it is a closely guarded secret. After being cast, the parts are gas forged to add integrity and strength. They then receive intermediate heat treatment before minor machining, and are then final heat-treated to an optimum Rockwell C hardness to insure optimum smoothness in operation and maximum wear. Much of the process is the same as that used in jet aircraft turbine technology.


Here a SureFire Tactical Light is mounted on the AA-12, using an MSP Light Link with the ASAR 30mm ring. Speaking of heat, the maximum temperature of the AA-12 has been measured at 256 degrees F at the gas port and 150 degrees F to the barrel. The glass-impregnated nylon stock will begin to melt at 450 degrees F to 475 F of heat, with deformation beginning just past 375 degrees F, so heat is not a factor with the gun.

Like Max Atchisson’s original design, the new AA-12 uses an 8-round box magazine and a 20-round drum, but are made of the same tough synthetic as the stock. While the new magazines resemble the original prototypes, many subtle improvements have been made to assure 100 percent reliability. In fact, Jerry Baber showed me cases of 400 AA-12 8-shot magazine bodies that were to be scrapped because of a single minor improvement that had been made. The 8-round box and 20-round drum are the only feed devices that will be offered for the gun, although a 32-round drum has been designed. A means of attaching two 8-round magazines side by side is not out of the question.

The magazines are inserted into a channel similar to that used on the Thompson SMG, and the magazine catch/release works like that of the M16 rifle. Pushing the release with the right index finger allows the magazine or drum to fall free. Insertion of fully loaded magazines is easy even with the bolt forward.

Also like the 1928 Thompson SMG, the AA-12 uses a topmounted cocking handle with a long extension that acts as a dust cover. At the front of the extension is a rocking piece that locks it forward until pulled back with the palm of the support hand. This cocking handle does not reciprocate with the bolt and is pushed all the way back forward after cocking the bolt group to the rear. Mounted on the left side of the gun, the selector is moved to the forward position to allow the trigger to be pulled and it is moved to the rear to prevent the trigger from being pulled. An ambidextrous safety/selector is being considered.

Constant Recoil System

No, it doesn’t kick -- honestly. To all but eliminate felt recoil and movement of the AA-12 when fired, the gun uses what is called the “constant recoil” principal used by Mr. L. James Sullivan who also designed the AR-15 rifle for Eugene Stoner. Sullivan used the “constant recoil” system in the Ultimax LMG he designed for Chartered Industries of Singapore (CIS).

In the constant recoil system, the bolt group never bottoms out (slams into a fixed object) at the end of its rearward travel, but stops gradually against the long recoil spring. While it may be hard to believe without experiencing it, this gentle operation causes the AA-12 to have almost no felt recoil. The open bolt firing also dampens recoil, resulting in 95 percent control of the weapon.



While the basic design of the AA-12 incorporated an 18” barrel, a 16” barrel was also perfected, but a special unit of the Military asked if a 14” barrel were possible. Jerry Baber decided to go even shorter and perfected a 13” barrel for the AA-12 using a redesigned gas port. Called the CQB, this version has overall length that is the same as the M4 Carbine, and the barrel can easily be left at 14” if desired with plenty of dwell time left over. Baber has also designed a system where the butt stock can be shortened by 3” if desired, but this version would have slightly more felt recoil. Since the stock was out being prototyped at the time of my visit, I did not see it.

The sights of the AA-12 are mounted on towers to provide cheek weld, and are quite simple. The front sight is adjustable for elevation by turning it against friction from a nylon bushing, and the rear sight is adjustable for windage via a drum. Two types of rear ghost ring sights have been designed, one in a figure “8” for holdover, but standard ghost-ring aperture will be used.

Disassembly

At the front of the gas block is a locking collar for the square tubular recoil spring guide, and on it is an extension to accept a standard M16 bayonet. A collar is also available without the extension. The two halves of the stock are locked together by steel tabs on both sides of the butt, in the middle and behind the gas block, as well as at the rear sight and on the bottom of the pistol grip. Except for those at the gas block, these can either slide or swivel to lock in place.


The AA-12 is seen disassembled with both magazines. The gun rarely requires complete disassembly.
The stock halves can be removed in seconds. Then with the magazine removed and the bolt allowed to go forward, the butt is pushed forward causing the recoil spring guide to protrude out the front of the gas block. The locking collar can then be removed and the butt, recoil spring guide and spring can then be allowed to exit from the rear under pressure. Once this assembly is removed, the piston/bolt carrier and bolt can be removed by pulling back on the charging handle. The handle can be removed out the front of the receiver and the bolt group can be disassembled if necessary. Using a simple pry tool, the barrel lock can be removed allowing the barrel to be removed and replaced with a different one for special- purpose missions.

Unless damaged, the sear housing, trigger and selector need never be removed. In fact, the same thing holds true for the entire weapon. This is because the special material it is made from requires no lubrication whatsoever. What’s more, the mechanism is selfcleaning even when contaminated by sand. In the worst-case scenario, a canteen (or similar) can be used to flush out the ejection port and everything in it. If this sounds too good to be true, you’ll just have to take my word for it.

Shots Fired

Having traveled to Tennessee to test the AA-12, I personally fired more than 500 rounds in two AA-12’s, and witnessed another 500 or so fired by seven others including two women who work in the B&H Precision foundry. Neither of these ladies had previously fired the AA-12 and they were more than a little nervous. The guns were fired from the hip, shoulder, with one hand, and upside down.



One of the AA-12’s we fired was the CQB model, and this little gun had more than 5,000 rounds fired through it and had never been cleaned, much less lubricated. One look at it and it was obvious. The entire mechanism was black with carbon and it was also totally dry. However, neither gun malfunctioned in any way during the shooting, most of which was done using low-brass target rounds, which are always a problem for self-loading shotguns, especially when dirty.

Except for the noise, shooting the target 12 ga. shells in the AA-12 was like shooting a .22 rimfire machinegun. Really! High brass buckshot and slugs produced more noise and a bigger muzzle flash from the CQB model, and also increased the cyclic rate, but the additional recoil generated was barely worth mentioning. It took the two ladies only a couple of short bursts before they were emptying 20-round drums without stopping, and they barely moved.

What was also impressive is that single and double shots could easily obtained because of the relatively slow cyclic rate of 300 rounds per minute. If two rounds were fired, they both hit in the same place out to 25 yards. Even CTS door-breaching rounds operated the AA-12, but when using less-lethal rounds the bolt must be cocked each time by hand. Hornady Manufacturing Company is looking into the possibility of other specialized 12-gauge ammunition.

It is a well-known fact that the Islamic terrorists killing our troops in Iraq are not afraid of the M4 and its 5.56mm bullet, but they are terrified of shotguns. You can imagine how they would react to the AA-12 with 20 rounds of buckshot, but that’s only half the story, as there is something far more effective.

Although there is currently no rail system on the AA-12, we mounted a SureFire X200 on the barrel using a Light Link from Mounting Solutions Plus. A hand-held SureFire light was also mounted using an E2 C G2 30mm scope mount from Abrams Small Arms Research (ASAR). Other mounting concepts are also being studied.

The FRAG-12

If you thought 12 gauge buckshot was an effective round, consider this: In October 2004 the U.S. Marine Corps began testing a new family of 12 ga. High-explosive rounds. These new rounds were developed by a private company to defeat reinforced, materiel and protected targets, and other targets requiring a high-explosive or armorpiercing warhead.


Called the FRAG-12, the program consists of a family of 12 ga. Highexplosive projectiles including a High Explosive (HE) Blast round, a HE Fragmentation round and a High Explosive Armor Piercing (HEAP) projectile with a shaped-charge penetrator.

Initial testing has confirmed that the HE Blast round will produce about a 1- inch hole in cold rolled steel plate with secondary spalling effects on the downrange side of the plate. The HE Fragmentation warhead is designed to have blast and fragmentation out to a 2-meter casualty radius and the HEAP round is claimed to be able to penetrate 4 inches of aluminum armor and more than ?-inch of steel. All three rounds have a 200m effective range.

My information is that 100 rounds of this ammunition were received at Quantico and that testing is almost complete as this is written in mid- January. Test data and any remaining cartridges will be transferred to MARCORSYSCOM for combat effectiveness and a potential requirement.

In plain English I can tell you that the Marine Corps wants this capability very badly, and at the general-officer level the AA-12 is also in great demand with the possibility that three guns will go to Iraq for field testing with the next rotation. Others in high places are pushing for the AA-12 to be tested throughout the military as soon as possible.
Although he’s no kid, Jerry Baber loves and respects those who are fighting what far too few understand is truly Global War On Terrorism. He also believes that every day our troops don’t have the Auto Assault-12 in their hands, more of them are dying than would otherwise be the case. Plenty of others believe it too. Beyond our military are elements of Homeland Security that have expressed great interest in the AA-12, such as or the guarding of our nuclear facilities. Foreign governments who are allies of the U.S., such as the Philippines, are also very interested, but in addition to them the AA-12 will be available only to the military and agencies of our Federal Government.

If your job description or agency qualifies as a potential purchaser of the Auto Assault-12, for information on your official letterhead, contact MPS, Inc., Dept. SOF, P.O. Box 753, Blountville, TN 37617; phone: 423- 534-2480.
 
Old 02-08-2008, 11:44 AM   #22
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 DblTap's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2006
From: Montana

Posts: 584
Here's some video of the AA-12 in action

 
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